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Archive for October, 2010

After a successful morning seeing Greer Spring, we headed north to see Mill Mountain Shut-Ins. The water was really low when we were there, so nothing was really flowing hard, but you can see that this area is probably a very neat place to visit after a hard rain. The trail to get there is a difficult hike if you don’t have a substantial 4×4 vehicle, which can take you about half way in to the foot trail.

To get to Mill Mountain:
From Eminence travel east on Highway 106 for about 7.5 miles. Turn right (south) on to Highway H and travel for 4 miles to the intersection with Highway NN. Go left (east) onto Highway NN and travel for almost 3 miles. Right before crossing Rocky Creek turn right (south) to the gravel road and pull-off. Park here and look for Ozark Trail signs. The Ozark Trail hiking trail crosses Rocky Creek here and heads north toward the natural area. It is a half-mile hike heading north on the Ozark Trail from the Rocky Creek Highway NN bridge to the natural area. Bring a map and compass for exploration.

All images taken with a Canon 5D MKii

Mill Mountain - Fall Reflections

Taken with Sigma 70-200 lens

Mill Mountain - Mill Mountain Low Cascades

Taken with Canon 24mm TS-E lens

Mill Mountain - Heart Rock Reflection

Taken with Sigma 70-200mm lens

Mill Mountain - Mill Mountain Upper Cascades

Taken with Sigma 70-200mm lens

Mill Mountain - Wraparound

Taken with Sigma 70-200mm lens

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There was no rain or cloud cover in sight, and I was desperate for some nature photography. We spent the night at the Greer Spring campground, and woke up early the next morning (about 5am) to beat the sunrise and shoot Greer. Greer Spring is one of the most forceful springs in the Missouri Ozarks, with an impressive boil coming from it.

The trail head is located 18 miles south of Winona and 7 miles north of Alton on Missouri Highway 19 about 1.5 miles south of the Highway 19 bridge that crosses the Eleven Point River and just north of the tiny town of Greer. A gravel parking area on the west side of Highway 19 provides parking for the trail. Visitors to the spring are common despite a mile long hike with several switchbacks down into the valley. The walk down is pleasant, but the walk back up to the parking area is a bit more strenuous.

Greer Spring

The force of 354 cubic feet per second of water makes for a forceful current, and the largest natural spring in Missouri. Taken with Canon 5D MKii and Canon 24mm TS-E lens

Greer Spring

Taken with Canon 5D MKii and Nikkon 55mm AI Micro lens

Greer Spring

Taken with Canon 5D MKii and Sigma 70-200 f/2.8 lens

Greer Spring

Water rushes around this moss covered rock at Greer Spring. Taken with Canon 5D MKii and Nikkon 55mm Micro AI lens

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